Contra Mundum
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Christianity and the arts

Reformed art: Does it exit?

A survey of Reformed writings on culture bring up extensive social, political and legal writings, and large overarching social theories based the creation order or covenantal arrangements. When it comes to the arts, either the production of arts themselves or writing about them— then not so much. Though they liked music and the grandees wanted their portraits painted, the Reformed have long sustained an antagonistic relation to the theater, at times suppressing it as immoral. Many have also regarded fiction as simply lies about people composed to titillate the indolent and debased. Novels, far back into the 19th century, have a secular perspective—perhaps that reflected the available readership.

Is art sacred?

In the ancient world it depicted the gods. It most Western homes through the 19th century it was predominantly icons. In modern times it is treated as something special that it is wicked to destroy. Should it enjoy this status? Will the internet, the video camera and industrial design erase the distinction between art and other artifacts of culture?
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Reformed art:

Does it exit?

A survey of Reformed writings on culture bring up extensive social, political and legal writings, and large overarching social theories based the creation order or covenantal arrangements. When it comes to the arts, either the production of arts themselves or writing about them— then not so much. Though they liked music and the grandees wanted their portraits painted, the Reformed have long sustained an antagonistic relation to the theater, at times suppressing it as immoral. Many have also regarded fiction as simply lies about people composed to titillate the indolent and debased. Novels, far back into the 19th century, have a secular perspective—perha ps that reflected the available readership.

Is art sacred?

In the ancient world it depicted the gods. It most Western homes through the 19th century it was predominantly icons. In modern times it is treated as something special that it is wicked to destroy. Should it enjoy this status? Will the internet, the video camera and industrial design erase the distinction between art and other artifacts of culture?